The Ten Virgins


Matthew 25

1-4:

Then shall the kingdom of heaven be likened unto ten virgins, which took their lamps, and went forth to meet the bridegroom. And five of them were wise, and five were foolish. They that were foolish took their lamps, and took no oil with them: But the wise took oil in their vessels with their lamps.

These ten virgins are all believers in Christ’s return. There are two groups. One group did not take extra oil because they believed the groom would return to get them soon. Therefore, they did not think they needed extra oil. The other group believed that the groom may take longer than expected so they took extra oil. They were prepared that He may not return as soon as the other group had believed.

5-9:

While the bridegroom tarried, they all slumbered and slept. And at midnight there was a cry made, Behold, the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him. Then all those virgins arose, and trimmed their lamps. And the foolish said unto the wise, Give us of your oil; for our lamps are gone out. But the wise answered, saying, Not so; lest there be not enough for us and you: but go ye rather to them that sell, and buy for yourselves.

We see here that the groom actually does tarry, or take longer than expected. Five still had oil, faith, and five did not. They who thought His return would be soon lost faith of His return. Their faith had burned out.

10-13:

And while they went to buy, the bridegroom came; and they that were ready went in with him to the marriage: and the door was shut. Afterward came also the other virgins, saying, Lord, Lord, open to us. But he answered and said, Verily I say unto you, I know you not. Watch therefore, for ye know neither the day nor the hour wherein the Son of man cometh.

The five that still had oil went with the groom but the others, whose oil burned out, were not permitted. The Lord did not know them. They were not given a second chance. The door was shut.

This parable is a perfect picture of Christ’s return and the “rapture”. You see, the two groups are pre-trib and post-trib. The other beliefs such as mid-trib fall inside one of these groups so they are not distinguished as groups set apart. They are merely sub-beliefs. Pre-trib and post-trib are the main groups of belief for Christ’s return and the “rapture”. The five without oil are the pre-trib group. They have faith in the beginning but when the groom doesn’t return as expected and they see all that is happening around them that they were taught they would not be part of, they will lose faith of the groom’s return or they will feel they missed the “rapture”. This will be a costly error. As we read from this parable, told by Jesus Christ, He says that when He gathers His people the door will be shut. No second chance to repent and turn to Him during the tribulation, as the pre-trib beliefs are. Many are going to lose their faith during the tribulation. Their oil will burn out.

We already know that God’s people will be on this earth during the tribulation. The scriptures tell us this and both groups believe it. Both groups also believe that during the tribulation many unbelievers will turn to God. So, if the “rapture” happens before the tribulation and Christ shuts the door, which we see from this parable, then how is it possible for God’s people to go through the tribulation? How is it possible for a second chance after the “rapture” when the door is shut? Answer: It is not possible. The ten virgins will go through the tribulation. One group will have faith to the end, the other group will not.

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